Resilience

“Resilience”

March,

“In like a lion, out like a lamb”

Typical weather for the month of March. March started with windy snowy days. Next were days of warming up and melting of snow. Then it turned cold again. Once that was done, weather warmed up again.

We got a good amount of snow, that took a while to melt. Once it melted, I saw some Crocuses come up. They are the first flowers to come up between the end of winter and the beginning of Spring. They come up during a time when the weather can be cold and snowy one day, then warm and sunny the next . Though they only bloom for a short time, they show their beauty and resilience of life.

For living things to survive and thrive, they must be adaptive and resilient. It’s part of life. Sometimes we have winters in our lives, where we must step up and persevere through whatever we’re facing.

There are spring and summer’s in our lives too. Whether it’s seeing a situation through, a project or goal, the spring/summer in our lives is when we can celebrate our successes and achievements.

Those warm, sunny days can make us feel fully alive and joyous.

Where ever we are in our life, we must rise up and meet the season.

We can do it.

Love, LG

Art News

Le Cadeau du Cheval“ Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits:

Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.” For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org

Kid Inside

“Kid Inside”

There is that time when we move from youth to adulthood.

My first full-time summer job was in the big city of Boston, the capital of Massachusetts. I was moving into the working world. I remember thinking, “This is serious. I must take on the role of being an adult.

This was a big step.

I remember being in the office working and feeling serious. My boss noticed and would say things to make me smile. I thought that was nice. Later a new secretary came to work with my boss. We found we had similarities. She was older and she had quite a sense of humor. We would talk and laugh a little.

I see now that felt more whole to me. We don’t have to be serious all the time. In fact there’s a kid inside of us just wanting to bounce around.

I remember the first time meeting my cousin who was physically and mentally challenged. I was a teenager then. I was excited to have a younger cousin. I had been the younger cousin in our family circle. I wanted to play with her. I showed her each one of my toys. Yet the odd thing was that she just sat with a blank stare on her face. She was somewhere in her own world.

The next morning my mom had given her a pad of paper and a pen. I saw her sitting in the corner seat . I was excited. I said to my aunt, “So she likes to draw”. My aunt’s answer seemed to have that touch of dealing with this situation all the time. She replied, “Yes, but she doesn’t quite draw, she scribbles”. I had a light bulb moment. “Drawing, scribbling, what’s the difference?” I sat down next to my cousin. She stopped drawing and withdrew a little. I wasn’t surprised. I picked up the pen. Nothing happened. So I drew a smiley face in the corner of the pad of paper. In that moment my cousin looked at me with the biggest, brightest smile. Wow. I felt, “Nice to meet you”. It was amazing.

Over the years when we visited, we would spend hours drawing together.

It turned out that was a pivotal moment in my life.

I’m now helping others who are challenged getting through each day. I have one participant that welcomed me to collaborate with him and his drawing. I come up with four characteristics for each drawing. I love the interaction and creative challenge.

It’s playful. And I enjoy not having to be serious all the time, like I thought I would have to as an adult. I have a silly, giggly side. I see things in different angles and ways. It’s fulfilling.

It’s about being whole.

Love, LG

Art News

Le Cadeau du Cheval“ Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits

Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.” For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org.