Action on Inspiration

“Action on Inspiration”

As I mentioned in last month’s newsletter, I combined my 2 passions ,Art and Horses, into my art business name.

In a recent conversation with a friend I realized that I really do take steps and efforts to incorporate each into my life. It’s not just business. It’s having these things in my life that fulfills me.

I work part-time on a horse farm in the mornings. I do love the barn environment and feeling close to horses and nature. I feel connected to what’s around me.

I also have been enjoying eating my lunch at the farm when I’m done. I can sit near the outdoor arena and watch horses being ridden. I can just relax and gaze over the farm land of grass hills and trees that line the property. I can gaze up at the sky above.

In these moments I’m observing and thinking about things. I find myself thinking about images and being inspired by what’s around me. It’s these things that may find themselves into one of my art works.

You can’t just sit home waiting for inspiration to happen. It’s takes action. Going some place, doing something, and being out there — that will lead you to finding what inspires you.

So get out there. Explore and get inspired.

 

Feature Art/Product:

Dressage Horse and Rider

scratch board

Original and Prints available for sale.

Check out Great Gift items at Lisa’s Art & Horses

Art News

Pawtucket Arts Collaborative Mill Gallery
Exhibit June 19 to September 4, 2014

Reception; Thursday, June 19
5:30pm – 7:00pm Music

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Le Cadeau du Cheval
Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits
Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.”
For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org.

Art and Horses

“Art and Horses”

Back in 1990, I started my art business and I chose to name it Lisa’s Art & Horses.
I chose ART & Horses because these are the two things that I am passionate about.

My mom would attest to how I’ve been drawing since I could picked up a pencil. I have spent many hours drawing, painting and creating works over the years.
My parents, teachers, and others would comment and encourage me to keep doing it.
I felt an amazing connection when I’d share my art with others.

I’ve spend time creating, honing my skills, and sharing my art with others. Thus the ART.

Horses
Well, I fell in love with these beautiful creatures on my first pony ride. I thought they were just beautiful. I felt “on top of the world” up on their back as someone led the pony I was on around the farm.
I read books, practiced drawing them, learned to ride them at horse camp, honed my riding skills and made sure I took time to be near them throughout my life.

I found a pattern when I reviewed my life. It is that through my school years, through job experiences, and my personal life, Art and Horses have been woven into it.

One job I held for about 11 years was an ornamental embroidery job, where I used my creative skills.
In my free time I took riding lessons to fulfill my “need to be around horses”.

With my art business, Lisa’s Art & Horses, one of the things I created was a line of Horse T-shirts that I have sold at craft fairs, art festivals,, and Horse and Rider stores.
And I’ve done countless images of horses over the years intermingled with other art.
Oh, one art project I was involved in had me create six Horse masks for a theatrical group’s production of “EQUUS”.

Presently I have a part-time job working at a horse farm, while I continue to create art works. .

So one can see where I came up with my art business name and that it does seem to resonate and reflect my life. Art and horses intertwined.

Presently on exhibit at the Pawtucket Arts Collaborative 2014 Summer members exhibit.

scratch board

See exhibit info in Art News.

Check out Great Gift items at Lisa’s Art & Horses

Art News

Pawtucket Arts Collaborative Mill Gallery
Exhibit June 19 to September 4, 2014

Reception; Thursday, June 19
5:30pm – 7:00pm Music

Le Cadeau du Cheval
Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits
Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.”
For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org.

The Daffodil Principle

April is when the daffodils come up. My daffodils leaves poked up through the ground and buds are getting ready to bloom.

I came across a story about daffodils that I’d like to share with you.
A story not just about a single flower, but also about growth and reaching upward.

The Daffodil Principle
~ by: Jaroldeen Asplund Edwards

Several times my daughter had telephoned to say, “Mother, you must come and see the daffodils before they are over.” I wanted to go, but it was a two-hour drive from Laguna to Lake Arrowhead. Going and coming took most of a day–and I honestly did not have a free day until the following week.

“I will come next Tuesday, ” I promised, a little reluctantly, on her third call.

Next Tuesday dawned cold and rainy. Still, I had promised, and so I drove the length of Route 91, continued on I-215, and finally turned onto Route 18 and began to drive up the mountain highway. The tops of the mountains were sheathed in clouds, and I had gone only a few miles when the road was completely covered with a wet, gray blanket of fog. I slowed to a crawl, my heart pounding. The road becomes narrow and winding toward the top of the mountain. As I executed the hazardous turns at a snail’s pace, I was praying to reach the turnoff at Blue Jay that would signify I had arrived. When I finally walked into Carolyn’s house and hugged and greeted my grandchildren I said, “Forget the daffodils, Carolyn! The road is invisible in the clouds and fog, and there is nothing in the world except you and these darling children that I want to see bad enough to drive another inch!”

My daughter smiled calmly,” We drive in this all the time, Mother.”

“Well, you won’t get me back on the road until it clears–and then I’m heading for home!” I assured her.

“I was hoping you’d take me over to the garage to pick up my car. The mechanic just called, and they’ve finished repairing the engine,” she answered.

“How far will we have to drive?” I asked cautiously.

“Just a few blocks,” Carolyn said cheerfully.

So we buckled up the children and went out to my car. “I’ll drive,” Carolyn offered. “I’m used to this.” We got into the car, and she began driving.

In a few minutes I was aware that we were back on the Rim-of-the-World Road heading over the top of the mountain. “Where are we going?” I exclaimed, distressed to be back on the mountain road in the fog. “This isn’t the way to the garage!”

“We’re going to my garage the long way,” Carolyn smiled, “by way of the daffodils.”

“Carolyn,” I said sternly, trying to sound as if I was still the mother and in charge of the situation, “please turn around. There is nothing in the world that I want to see enough to drive on this road in this weather.”

“It’s all right, Mother,” She replied with a knowing grin. “I know what I’m doing. I promise, you will never forgive yourself if you miss this experience.”

And so my sweet, darling daughter who had never given me a minute of difficulty in her whole life was suddenly in charge — and she was kidnapping me! I couldn’t believe it. Like it or not, I was on the way to see some ridiculous daffodils — driving through the thick, gray silence of the mist-wrapped mountaintop at what I thought was risk to life and limb.

I muttered all the way. After about twenty minutes we turned onto a small gravel road that branched down into an oak-filled hollow on the side of the mountain. The Fog had lifted a little, but the sky was lowering, gray and heavy with clouds.

We parked in a small parking lot adjoining a little stone church. From our vantage point at the top of the mountain we could see beyond us, in the mist, the crests of the San Bernardino range like the dark, humped backs of a herd of elephants. Far below us the fog-shrouded valleys, hills, and flatlands stretched away to the desert.

On the far side of the church I saw a pine-needle-covered path, with towering evergreens and manzanita bushes and an inconspicuous, lettered sign “Daffodil Garden.”

We each took a child’s hand, and I followed Carolyn down the path as it wound through the trees. The mountain sloped away from the side of the path in irregular dips, folds, and valleys, like a deeply creased skirt.

Live oaks, mountain laurel, shrubs, and bushes clustered in the folds, and in the gray, drizzling air, the green foliage looked dark and monochromatic. I shivered.

Then we turned a corner of the path, and I looked up and gasped. Before me lay the most glorious sight, unexpectedly and completely splendid. It looked as though someone had taken a great vat of gold and poured it down over the mountain peak and slopes where it had run into every crevice and over every rise. Even in the mist-filled air, the mountainside was radiant, clothed in massive drifts and waterfalls of daffodils. The flowers were planted in majestic, swirling patterns, great ribbons and swaths of deep orange, white, lemon yellow, salmon pink, saffron, and butter yellow.

Each different-colored variety (I learned later that there were more than thirty-five varieties of daffodils in the vast display) was planted as a group so that it swirled and flowed like its own river with its own unique hue.

In the center of this incredible and dazzling display of gold, a great cascade of purple grape hyacinth flowed down like a waterfall of blossoms framed in its own rock-lined basin, weaving through the brilliant daffodils.

A charming path wound throughout the garden. There were several resting stations, paved with stone and furnished with Victorian wooden benches and great tubs of coral and carmine tulips. As though this were not magnificence enough, Mother Nature had to add her own grace note — above the daffodils, a bevy of western bluebirds flitted and darted, flashing their brilliance. These charming little birds are the color of sapphires with breasts of magenta red. As they dance in the air, their colors are truly like jewels above the blowing, glowing daffodils. The effect was spectacular.

It did not matter that the sun was not shining. The brilliance of the daffodils was like the glow of the brightest sunlit day. Words, wonderful as they are, simply cannot describe the incredible beauty of that flower-bedecked mountain top.

Five acres of flowers! (This too I discovered later when some of my questions were answered.) “But who has done this?” I asked Carolyn. I was overflowing with gratitude that she brought me — even against my will. This was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

“Who?” I asked again, almost speechless with wonder, “And how, and why, and when?”

“It’s just one woman,” Carolyn answered. “She lives on the property. That’s her home.” Carolyn pointed to a well-kept A-frame house that looked small and modest in the midst of all that glory.

We walked up to the house, my mind buzzing with questions. On the patio we saw a poster. ” Answers to the Questions I Know You Are Asking” was the headline. The first answer was a simple one. “50,000 bulbs,” it read. The second answer was, “One at a time, by one woman, two hands, two feet, and very little brain.” The third answer was, “Began in 1958.”

There it was. The Daffodil Principle.

For me that moment was a life-changing experience. I thought of this woman whom I had never met, who, more than thirty-five years before, had begun — one bulb at a time — to bring her vision of beauty and joy to an obscure mountain top. One bulb at a time.

There was no other way to do it. One bulb at a time. No shortcuts — simply loving the slow process of planting. Loving the work as it unfolded.

Loving an achievement that grew so slowly and that bloomed for only three weeks of each year. Still, just planting one bulb at a time, year after year, had changed the world.

This unknown woman had forever changed the world in which she lived. She had created something of ineffable magnificence, beauty, and inspiration.

The principle her daffodil garden taught is one of the greatest principle of celebration: learning to move toward our goals and desires one step at a time — often just one baby-step at a time — learning to love the doing, learning to use the accumulation of time.

When we multiply tiny pieces of time with small increments of daily effort, we too will find we can accomplish magnificent things. We can change the world.

“Carolyn,” I said that morning on the top of the mountain as we left the haven of daffodils, our minds and hearts still bathed and bemused by the splendors we had seen, “it’s as though that remarkable woman has needle-pointed the earth! Decorated it. Just think of it, she planted every single bulb for more than thirty years. One bulb at a time! And that’s the only way this garden could be created. Every individual bulb had to be planted. There was no way of short-circuiting that process. Five acres of blooms. That magnificent cascade of hyacinth!

All, all, just one bulb at a time.”

The thought of it filled my mind. I was suddenly overwhelmed with the implications of what I had seen. “It makes me sad in a way,” I admitted to Carolyn. “What might I have accomplished if I had thought of a wonderful goal thirty-five years ago and had worked away at it ‘one bulb at a time’ through all those years. Just think what I might have been able to achieve!” My wise daughter put the car into gear and summed up the message of the day in her direct way. “Start tomorrow,” she said with the same knowing smile she had worn for most of the morning. Oh, profound wisdom!

It is pointless to think of the lost hours of yesterdays. The way to make learning a lesson a celebration instead of a cause for regret is to only ask, “How can I put this to use tomorrow?”
Happy Spring

Feature Art/product:

Lori’s Foal

Pastel portrait.

Signs of spring in fuller bloom. A foal taking in it’s first day outside in the warming spring air.

I do portraits of animals and people.
Contact me if you’re interested.

Thank you
Lisa G.

Check out Great Gift items at Lisa’s Art & Horses

Art News

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Le Cadeau du Cheval

Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits
Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.”

For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org.

Life Long Love

“Life Long Love”

Art has been an important part of my life.

In my life it’s encompassed learning to draw and paint, studying other artist as the masters and creating work.

It is very much an important part of my life.

It’s enriching to read about other artist’s life too.

One of my favorite artists is Renoir. He was one of the great Expressionist.  I love how he captured light and a mood in his colorful paintings of people.

I received a book about Renoir’s Life, Art and Letters.

One of my favorite paintings is “ Dance at Bougival”.

I’ve seen it live at the Fine Art museum in Boston, MA. I feel like I can feel the two dancers swaying with each other admist the dance.

Renoir would produce paintings through his entire life. Even when he developed rheumatiod arthritis later in his life, he found a way to keep on creating. Creating was at the center of his life. In that lifetime he and his fellow artists, like Monet, would explore and create a new movement called expressionism.

He would die in 1919 at seventy three yrs old. His paintings would continue to be exhibited and viewed by people.  Even today one can visit museums and see the work of the masters through time.

I’ve always sort of had a sense of always doing my art throughout my life too. I’ve felt like I am meant to create art, as Renoir had been. I don’t know that I’ll create an art movement or not, but I’ll always strive to do my best work.

My mom comments that I started drawing when I first picked up a pencil. I’ve kept at it through the years: learning, studying, working, and creating.

Recently we moved my mom to an assisted living place. My sisters and I are in the process of getting the old homestead in order for sale. I came across a couple of pieces of my art work from my high school yrs.

I took oil paintings lessons with a local well-known artist, Lee Parsons, in the early 1980’s.

Around that same time period the movie “The Black Stallion” came out. Of course I went to see it.
I did my own Black Stallion painting in the oil painting class.

This oil painting is my version of the Black Stallion.

I also have a charcoal drawing of a herd of horses. I entered this art work into the Randolph Art Association’s Student exhibit. I received my first 1st place ribbon for my art work.

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I continue to do my art work. I have done some really neat creative projects and have had some exhibits of my work.

I plan to always take the time to make art no matter how old I get. I’ll be approaching in a couple of years – the golden jubilee, – 48 this Feb. 7. So thinking of such things. I plan to create art throughout my life time as Renoir did.

One is never too old to create.

Check out Great Gift items at Lisa’s Art & Horses

Gift Certificates available.

 

Art  News 

 

Le Cadeau du Cheval

Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits
Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.”

For more information, contact Darla (darla@darladixon.com) or visit SoldierPortraits.org.

The Twisting Road

Happy Halloween

“The Twisting Road ”

I recently accepted a Part-Time job working at Lend-A-Hand therapeutic riding farm.

I work in the mornings. I do barn chores such as filling water troughs and cleaning paddocks. I get to spend time on a farm with horses, bunnies, a cat and a mama pig. As farm life would have it, there are always things to do.

I had been volunteering there on Mondays each week.

Recently I found a need to find a part-time job with more hours.

I work at the girl’s school in the mornings, yet it was only a few hours a week. I am still working there since I like being a part of their school. Yet the need for more was there.

To be honest, I have been finding my art career- business a bit challenging so looking for other work was called for.

This opportunity came up. So I took it.

As I fill a trough with water I can watch the horses in the pasture.
I can also gaze at the trees that line the farm and take in the colors of Fall.
Or watch a hawk circle high above in the sky.

Who would have thought, me?

Opportunities come. And they can show up in ways that can be unexpected.

When I think about the jobs I have had I see that I have had some that would be “usual” jobs that one could list off.

I have worked at a library, State Dept. as a summer Intern during college years, some office work.

Yet I also have had some long standing work in what would seem like “unusual” jobs.

One job entailed doing hand embroidery and hand work for a company that made items for the Masonic organizations. I worked there for 11 yrs.

I remember that interview well. The employment agency I was with referred me to this job. I was told it would be some office work and /or cutting out fabric, etc.

The interview started out pleasant and “normal”. Then I followed the owner to the back work room area. The owner at one point held out a Fez and asked me if I’d seen this kind of hat before. I had seen the masonic members at parades. I would find out later in time that my dad had been a member of a masonic chapter.
The owner explained that the rhinestones and wire were hand sewn since it couldn’t be done by machine. She asked me if I’d be willing to do it.

I needed a job so I said, “Yeah, I’ll give a try”.

I’d give it “Go”. “Why not”.

What I didn’t anticipate was that it would end up a fit for the time and I would be very good at it.
“Who knew?”

I also began my art business. And have had some interesting projects along the way. (see “EQUUS” below)

When first out of college, I can remember having high expectations and some sort of map and plan.

Well, it didn’t go the way I had it in my mind back then.

A phrase from “Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck.

“Best-laid plans of mice and men oft(en) go astray”

Life happens.

And yet I also know well and admire a quote from Henry David Thoreau. This is one of my favorites. It resonates with me. I so hear my drummer.

“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.”

Follow that natural rhythm within. Go where it leads.

 

Feature Art/Product:



EQUUS” masks were made for Ubiquity stage’s production of “EQUUS” by Peter Shaffer.

I designed and created these twisted wire horse masks.

Taking an idea and creating it into a physical form.

This project has always been a highlight for me.

The EQUUS mask has been used:
in another theatrical performance.
Worn for Halloween.
Exhibited in a local artist member exhibit with the theme “Masked and Unmasked”.
changed up and used for a performance of “Midsummer Nights Dream” with “Malden Shakespear in the Park.”

Gotta love it.

Check out Great Gift items at Lisa’s Art & Horses

Order a “White on Black” 2014 calendar at lulu.com.

 

Art News

Le Cadeau du Cheval
Several artists in the Equine Art Guild were a part of this unique tribute to the horse. Click on the image above to read all about it and the artists who participated in it’s creation, as well as see where it will be coming to a location near you in the coming year!

Soldier Portraits
Darla Dixon organized a group of artists who will create no-charge compassionate portraits for the families who have lost a loved one in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. We are looking for artists to join our efforts, and also for non-artists who will help spread the word about this free service and token of our gratitude to families who have sacrificed so much.”
For more information, visit SoldierPortraits.org.